Anaheim’s Jagerhaus receives multiple awards

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The moment I walked in to the Jagerhaus, I felt a sense of community. The warmth of Sandie Schwaiger, the restaurant owner and manager could be felt as she welcomed customers in wearing white go-go boots and a flowy, turquoise top. As she spoke to regulars popping in for their favorite dishes, it was easy to see that the Jagerhaus was more than a restaurant with an invisible owner. It was a Bavarian abode complete with a beautiful homemaker inviting people into her world. 

The moment I walked in to the Jagerhaus, I felt a sense of community. The warmth of Sandie Schwaiger, the restaurant owner and manager could be felt as she welcomed customers in wearing white go-go boots and a flowy, turquoise top. As she spoke to regulars popping in for their favorite dishes, it was easy to see that the Jagerhaus was more than a restaurant with an invisible owner. It was a Bavarian abode complete with a beautiful homemaker inviting people into her world. 

After nearly 37 years in business, Schwaiger stumbled into ownership of the Jagerhaus 17 years ago through a series of unpredictable events. However, it’s clear that despite Schwaiger’s initial inexperience with the restaurant business, it is here that she was meant to be all along. As Schwaiger revamped the restaurant, loyal employees like Reuben Velasquez helped the business blossom into the fabulous establishment it is today. 

Recently the recipient of a ton of accolades from the Southern California Writer’s Association,  Jagerhaus has been honored with a longevity award for being in business for over 37 years, a four star award for its delicious food and service and of course, Schwaiger was awarded manager of the year. 

It’s easy to see why Schwaiger received such an honor. Not only is she friendly and kind to her customers but she takes great care of her workers, making sure there are rubber mats in the kitchen for the cooks and providing compression socks to the waiters who are constantly on their feet. 

When I asked Schwaiger what her favorite thing about being at the restaurant was her blue eyes brightened; “I love to go around and visit with the people at the tables. I don’t just barge in if they’re having a conversation but I like to say hello and let them know it’s nice to have them here. Sometimes, we get in a great conversation about who knows what and it’s fun. I get to hear some of the best stories. ”

Besides hearing the best stories, Schwaiger’s Jagerhaus feels like the setting of a Bavarian storybook complete with unique knickknacks and decor, framed reviews hanging on the walls, and of course, interesting people sitting at the tables savoring the German genius. 

Because most German restaurants in the L.A. and O.C. area don’t serve full meals (usually sticking to bratwurst and beers), I was delighted by all the delicious options at Jagerhaus. With recipes that have been handed down for seven generations, the food is authentic, made to eat every single day just like it is in Southern Germany. “We get really high marks from the Germans” said Schwaiger, “They come in and say, ‘Wow, this is just like home.’” Everything in Jagerhaus is made fresh including the Spätzle, a soft egg noodle that takes about an hour and a half to cook from scratch.  

As I delighted in a soft, doughy pretzel, I learned that the Jagerhaus had the oldest beers in the entire world. The Weihenstephaner is a light beer on tap from the year 1040 and the Weltenberger is a darker beer on tap from the year 1050. Last year was the 500th anniversary of the purity laws, a collective of regulations limiting the number of ingredients in German beer to four: hops, malt, water, and yeast. In comparison, the beer made in the United States can have as many as 36 chemicals. Jagerhaus also carries delicious Austrian sodas and bottled water that is straight off the Austrian glaciers.

For those who aren’t very familiar with German food, Schwaiger recommends trying the Jägerschnitzel which at its core is a thin cutlet of meat served with a mushroom gravy. After your meal, make sure to check out the dessert selection. They have black forest cake,  apple strudal, bread pudding, peach cobbler and German chocolate cake – all made in house. If you want to order it for an occasion it can also be made ahead of time. 

There is also a banquet room that holds 90 people and can be set-up for  professional organizations who are looking to meet on a regular basis or for events.  There is no charge for the room and guests can pick three entries and three side dishes from their regular menu with unlimited tea, soft drinks, and bread-and-butter for a nominal price. 

 “Mothers day will be a marathon day” said Schwaiger, noting that red carnations will be given out to every Mom. This is the kind of thought that goes into Schwaiger’s restaurant- leave customers feeling both full as well as seen and appreciated. 

After over 37 years in business, it’s safe to say that there is something special about the Jagerhaus in Anaheim. But, pinning down just exactly what that special thing is proves impossible. Perhaps, it’s the cooks and servers that seem to be more of a family than a group of coworkers. Perhaps, it’s the delicious dishes that seem to be made artfully, rather than dutifully. Or perhaps, it’s the warmth of Schwaiger that draws in people from all walks of life. Regardless, the Jagerhaus is a special place with a charm that cannot be contained. And a menu that must be indulged in. 

Visit the Jagerhaus at 2325 E Ball Rd. Anaheim. Call ahead for reservations at 714-520-9500. 

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